Special Political and Decolonization Committee (SPECPOL)

Topic 1: Sustainable Global Supply Chains


The UN Global Compact ranks supply chain practices as the biggest challenge to improving their sustainability performance. Due to the scale and complexity of many supply chains, especially in big businesses whose business methods have the largest impact on the environment, it becomes very difficult to change current practices to set higher, environmentally friendly expectations on aspects of their supply chain such as selection, training, auditing and remediation. However, regardless the challenge it may bring, bringing an element of sustainability to global supply chain management is crucial because it does not just influence environmental factors, but humanitarian ones as well. It is estimated that only 90 of the world’s biggest companies have caused almost two thirds of the overall level of man-made global warming. Regulating such businesses has already been difficult, but as globalization continues to push big business towards outsourcing in search of expanding their global supply chains, it will become even more difficult to track and regulate their actions. That is why it is imperative that work is done now towards demanding greater accountability on part of international companies, regulating their actions most specifically those that notoriously negatively impact the environment, and enforcing those rules through innovative, functional methods of oversight.

 

Topic 2: Question of the Western Sahara


The dispute over the ultimate status of Western Sahara, most specifically on the legitimate exercise of self determination, has led to a tense and problematic impasse both in the region and the international community at large. The Western Sahara remains Africa’s last colony, with its people, the Sahrawis, desperately seeking the relief that they hope will come with self-determination. Over half the population of Sahrawi people currently live as refugees in their own country, surviving in desert or military occupied camps. Even though the right to formal self determination was legally established more than 20 years ago, the United Nations remains unable to carry out the tasks necessary to begin the process of referendum, due to an unwilling Security Council barring further action and a General Assembly that has relinquished its historical role in decolonization efforts. After 20 years of desperate waiting, it is crucial the Special Political and Decolonization Committee rises to the challenge of overcoming the impasse within the United Nations, and oversee the process of self-determination for Western Sahara.

Committee

Roles:

Morocco

Sudan

Ghana

Mauritania

Algeria

Somalia

South Africa

Malawi

Rwanda

Nigeria

India

Japan

Philippines

China

Vietnam

Republic of Lithuania

South Africa

Guatemala

Papua New Guinea

Republic of Korea

United Arab Emirates

Afghanistan

Lebanon

Iraq

Russian Federation

Czech Republic

Belarus

Azerbaijan

Mexico

Chile

Peru

Guyana

Colombia

Commonwealth of Australia

Republic of Croatia

Norway

Kingdom of Cambodia

Haiti

Venezuela

Ecuador

El Salvador

France

Germany

Ireland

Denmark

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Canada

Italy

Turkey

United States of America

Federative Republic of Brazil

Spain

The Philippines

Kingdom of Thailand

Kazakhstan