UN Commission on the Status of Women

Topic 1: Violence Against Women in Conflict Zones

It is estimated by the UN Commission on the Status of Women that 35% of women worldwide have experienced either physical or sexual violence by a non-partner at some point in their lives. However, in regions experiencing the highest frequency of conflict or a lower standard of living, this number exponentially increases. In studies ranging from the Middle East and North Africa, to Latin America and the Caribbean, sexual violence is clearly seen as a product of what children are taught through their parents, and an inability to regulate and protect the women involved given the deeply struggling nature of their communities. The most prominent methods of improving the situations worldwide for such women are typically encouraging the passage of sexual-violence legislation from within the troubled country, and improving the access to services beyond only what the country is offering for its citizens, such as internationally run and recommended services through the United Nations and other IGOs. Therefore, the greatest challenge of the UN Commission on the Status of Women in addressing this topic is deciding how to most effectively extend assistance through programs and other forms of aid to countries struggling due to violence, corruption, or poverty, and further how to persuade the government’s of these countries towards making greater steps towards protecting the rights and general safety of its women population.

Topic 2: Access to Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

In 2016, there was an estimated 17.8 million women living with HIV (over 51% of the total population struggling with the disease). In regions of lower socioeconomic statuses, such as Sub-Saharan Africa or the Caribbean, young women between the age of 15 and 24 account from anywhere from 35% to 67% of newly infected patients. At the same age, sex workers around the world are 14 times more likely to contract the disease. The main contributing factor to the continued spread of HIV is not only the prevalence of sexual violence against women, but also the general lack of access to sexual and reproductive healthcare. In the areas that need it most, the supply of vaccinations, antiretroviral therapy, and other forms of healthcare are severely limited. Organizations like the The Global Fund to Fight AIDs, Tuberculosis, and Malaria has begun to work on tackling the issue, increasing expenditure benefiting now 60% of women and girls in their total portfolio in 2016, but more needs to be done. It is the task of the UN Commission on the Status of Women to find new, innovative, and effective ways of distributing greater medical supplies to regions that are most in need, and ensuring the access to consistent and adequate sexual and reproductive healthcare by women in struggling communities.

Committee

Roles:

Morocco

Sudan

Ghana

Cameroon

Algeria

Somalia

South Africa

Malawi

Rwanda

Nigeria

India

Japan

Philippines

China

Equatorial New Guinea

Qatar

Kenya

Brazil

Ghana

United Arab Emirates

Afghanistan

Lebanon

Iraq

Russian Federation

Czech Republic

Belarus

Azerbaijan

Mexico

Chile

Peru

Guyana

Colombia

Venezuela

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Norway

Islamic Republic of Iran

Tunisia

Spain

Ecuador

El Salvador

France

Germany

Ireland

Denmark

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Canada

Italy

Turkey

Republic of Korea

United States of America

Haiti

Comoros

Nicaragua

Turkmenistan

Israel